Zip Cinema / poly.m.ur | ArchDaily

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© KyungsubShin© KyungsubShin© KyungsubShin© KyungsubShin+ 20


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    2503 m²

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2017


  • Photographs Photographs: KyungsubShin

  • Principal architects:

    Homin kim

© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin

Text description provided by the architects. Zip Cinema is a leading film studio in Korea known for a long list of hit titles such as Jeon Woochi: The Taoist Wizard (2009), Cold Eyes (2013) and The Priests (2015) and they were working on a plan to build a new head office. The first meeting with the client took place amicably because the two parties had committed to the same objective: zip, which is the name of the studio and which also means “house” in Korean. However, the decision by Zip Cinema, a studio that has produced 10 films in the past 10 years, to partner with a relatively new architectural firm with a decade of history may have been somewhat unexpected at first. . Moving away from Gangnam, Seoul’s main shopping area, and moving its headquarters to Paju, Gyeonggi-do was a bold move for a burgeoning film studio.

© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin
Ground floor Plan
Ground floor Plan
© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin

The film industry has forged close ties with the corporate world, especially the financial industry, as its reliance on capital and distribution has become a critical aspect of success. Majority of movie studios established their headquarters in Gangnam despite a long list of adversities such as high rent, limited parking space and unimaginative office layout as they had to stay close to their financial and marketing partners. . Zip Cinema President Eugene Lee made the decision to go against the grain and find a new home away from Seoul in the Paju Publishing Complex because she knows all about taking risks to do so. career in a male dominated industry. Most importantly, she wanted to recognize and reward her staff with an environment that valued and motivated creativity, as their dedication and commitment was integral to the studio’s success.

© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin
Section
Section
© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin

In addition to the background, the actual needs of the film studio were carefully considered early in the design process. The first major area of ​​work involved meetings and a lot of them to work on scenarios and brainstorming sessions. The other main activity was, of course, the production and release of films. For these two purposes, 2 separate multipurpose rooms have been placed on each side of the building. The room space that spans 2 stories creates a refreshing sense of openness when not in use, but is fully utilized for premieres, publicity events, or the backdrop for the interview with the casting when the film is scheduled for release.

© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin

For the nature of the business that requires constant exposure to media, this is a necessary and integral space that fully meets their needs. In addition, the openness and free space of the floor area ratio requirement was also the very reason for the customer’s departure from densely populated Seoul. The Zip cinema in Paju is designed to have 4 floors measuring 15 meters in height, the maximum authorized by regulations. The cafe and multipurpose room were placed on the 1st floor to accommodate visitors, but the cafe was designed to be slightly submerged, 1 meter, like a space below with the exception of the main hallway. As studio staff have meetings with screenwriters or welcome visitors to the café, the lowered line of sight from the sunken position creates comfort and safety. The extended ceiling height is a welcome side effect. The multipurpose room adjacent to the cafe is designed to facilitate various events for a large group of people involving movie releases such as premieres and interviews.

© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin

Meanwhile, the floors above the 1st floor were reserved exclusively for studio staff, such as staff and writers. The east wing multipurpose room is located on the 2nd floor with an open ceiling up to the 3rd floor for use by staff taking a break to relax or stretch. The openness of the space also makes it an ideal location for the weekly studio meeting with all staff present. The office space has been designed according to the orientation for the greatest efficiency and effectiveness. For example, the west-facing offices were designed to block out the scorching afternoon sun with tall, narrow walls covering more than half of the facade. The walls functioned like louvers, and its angular orientation effectively controlled the sunlight entering inside. The north and south facing offices have stayed true to the overall design concept for effortless consistency and appearance. The spatial element that best symbolized Zip Cinema was incorporated into the south elevation.

© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin

It is in human nature to privilege the space considered appropriate to its scale. That’s why you see people favor comfortable nooks and spaces over large, open ballrooms. Engaging in conversations about water coolers in the office pantry or on the stairs is a big part of business life for the same reason. To this end, a concept of “micro” space has been adopted for the south elevation. Unlike a room identified by walls, a space has been created by converging the balcony on the outside with the corner on the inside. The warm and relaxing atmosphere of the space helps staff protect themselves from stress and pressure away from their workstations while taking a coffee break or engaging in friendly conversation. Part of the 4th floor is intended exclusively for the screenwriter with a shower cubicle, kitchen and dormitory so their creative minds can live and work at headquarters. If they need a break or some fresh air, they can easily climb to the roof where there is a rest area.

© KyungsubShin
© KyungsubShin



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